Wales could be playing home Six Nations fixtures in England, according to reports.

Wales have three fixtures scheduled for the Principality Stadium as they look to defend their title, with Scotland heading to Cardiff on February 12 followed by France and Italy on March 11 and 19 respectively.

However, sporting fixtures are currently being played behind closed doors because of Welsh Government restrictions, raising the possibility of another financial hammer blow to the professional game.

With no indication given on when the ban on fans will end, the BBC is reporting that the Welsh Rugby Union is looking at the possibility of playing in England where supporters are still allowed in.

READ MORE: What does 'riding out' Omicron mean for Wales?

Speaking to BBC Wales on Wednesday, Wales' Health Minister Eluned Morgan said: "We’d be disappointed if the WRU made that decision [to move games to be played in England].

"There would obviously be financial consequences for them and there is an understanding from the Welsh Government that we would have to step in to support them financially if they did have to postpone those matches or cancel them.

"If they decided to go to England then it would be more difficult for us to come up with that financial support."

However, Ms Morgan remained hopeful, saying that it was still "early days".

"Omicron is moving very quickly," she said.

"We’re hoping that we reach the peak and come down very quickly. "Two of the matches are due to be played in March, so who knows?"

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Fly-half Dan Biggar spoke last week about the possible impact on Wales’ title defence if they have to play behind closed doors.

He said: “Everyone coming to games now has to have a passport, they’ll be double or triple-jabbed and it’s an outdoor event, so I don’t see why they wouldn’t be allowed in. As long as it’s safe, that’s the most important thing.

“It would be a huge, huge step backwards if there are no crowds for clubs and the Six Nations, which is obviously such a show-piece event.

“We played a lot of games with no crowds and if you look at the first handful of them, they almost felt like training games.

“As long as everyone is safe and double jabbed then I think it makes sense to keep crowds in.”

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