WREXHAM AFC is facing disciplinary charges following incidents of crowd disorder, it has been confirmed.

The club has issued a message of thanks to all supporters "for their incredible following, home and away, throughout the season so far," adding gratitude to "the majority of fans for their excellent behaviour."

But a spokesman added: "We are sad and disappointed to report that due to the action of a very small minority of those attending, we are facing disciplinary charges following incidents of crowd disorder.

"The club regrets having to state what to so many supporters is obvious, but we urge everyone to help us to stamp out these incidents so we can all enjoy watching Wrexham AFC together.

"Your behaviour when supporting Wrexham AFC not only reflects on the club, but certain recent incidents will also result in the club having to pay fines.

"We are proud to be a welcoming family club, and we are proud of the role we play in our community, and this behaviour goes against both."

The club has said that home or away, supporters should not under any circumstances:

  • Enter the field of play, at any time.
  • Throw objects, such as bottles and especially pyrotechnics
  • Bring, let alone use, pyrotechnics such as flares and smoke bombs to any stadium.

The spokesman continued: "The use of pyrotechnics at all football stadiums is strictly prohibited. Smoke bombs and flares are not welcome under any circumstances, and supporters using them face ejection and bans.

"It goes without saying how dangerous these are. They produce acrid smoke, which impacts on your fellow supporters’ health, and we are aware of a recent incident in which somebody was nearly hit with one.

"We boast some of the most passionate football fans in the Vanarama National League and when we come together, loudly and vocally backing the team such as at our most recent home game, we can make a big difference to the players on the pitch.

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"We do not need this to be artificially added to through the use of dangerous and prohibited items, and nor is there any reason to ever enter the field of play.

"Wrexham AFC strongly condemns the behaviour of a tiny minority of attendees, whose actions are impacting on the match-going experience, home and away, of our true supporters and tarnishing the Club’s name.

"This includes the behaviour of a small minority of people whose anti-social behaviour and disorder outside of the stadiums has been brought to our attention by the local police forces.

"We are working with North Wales Police to identify those involved in these isolated incidents, and anybody found to be in breach of ground regulations, or engaging in disorder or anti-social behaviour, face stadium bans."

The National Wales: Wrexham AFC owners Ryan Reynolds (left) and Rob McElhenney.Wrexham AFC owners Ryan Reynolds (left) and Rob McElhenney.

CEO Fleur Robinson said: “Wrexham AFC strongly condemns the anti-social behaviour and disorder we have seen around some of our recent matches.

“While we appreciate this is only a very small minority, this behaviour reflects on all of us at the Football Club and needs to be stamped out immediately.

“Wrexham AFC is proud to be a community club, and to provide a safe and welcoming environment for all supporters.

“We will continue to work together with North Wales Police to ensure behaviour that goes against this is eradicated, and take firm action against anybody found to be engaged in such behaviour.”

Superintendent Jane Banham, of North Wales Police, also condemned the behaviour. She said: “We are committed to taking a robust stance towards tackling any football related disorder and anti-social behaviour involving Wrexham football fans.

“The majority of football fans are well behaved and want to attend matches free from the fear of violence and disorder.

“We will continue to work with Wrexham Football Club to try and prevent harm to those law-abiding fans who wish to enjoy the game, to the local community who have a right not to have their lives disrupted by football related disorder and those who work in and around the ground who have the right to work without fear of violence and intimidation.”

Anyone who spots anything of concern at a match is urged to report it to a steward.

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