The small village of Ceinws in the Dulas valley stands on the western border of Montgomeryshire and Eryri.

It is also known as Esgairgeiliog - ‘the leg of cockerel’ - though some believe it is a corruption of the word Esgair Cyfeiliog, the name of ancient cantref which had once been ruled by both rulers of Powys and Gwynedd

Locals have long had other names, including Aberglesrych, for the nearby Glesrych river which feeds the Dulas, Anchor, the name of the village’s original chapel, and Ceinws as it is shown on maps.

Slate was quarried in the area as early as the 15th century with some quarries flourishing into the 19th century.

Coloreiddyn, Cambrian Wynn and Rhiwgwreiddyn quarries were all established employers in the area from 1818 while quarries were also founded at Aberllefenni and Llwyngwern.

The National Wales: The valley of Afon Dulas. Picture: Geograph.

The valley of Afon Dulas. Picture: Geograph.

It is thought Ceinws had been used as the village’s name at around the same time when the family hailing from a farm by that name had built a mill and led to a population growth in the century with the Calvanistic Methodist Ebenezer Chapel built in 1840 and the Tabernacle Church built in 1895.

In 1844 the village became part of the so-called 'Corris, Machynlleth and River Dovey Tramroad' and home to a station linked to other quarries.

From 1858 slate was carried along the route to port at Derwenlas where ships awaited to transport the slate which had been in demand for use in roofing the homes and factories in new towns and cities sprouting up across Britain as a result of the Industrial Revolution.

The National Wales: The line was built to take slate from the quarries above Corris to first the river, then the railway line, at Machynlleth. Picture: Geograph.

The line was built to take slate from the quarries above Corris to first the river, then the railway line, at Machynlleth. Picture: Geograph.

In 1879 the horses were retired and the tramroad converted to steam and in 1883 began its life as a passenger train and came to flourish as the Ceredigion coast enjoyed a tourism boom thanks to the rail revolution.

Passenger services came to an end in 1930 and in 1938 the state of the line had deteriorated to the extent two sleepers were discovered suspended in mid air near the Dyfi Bridge after some of the track gave way.

The National Wales: Coed Fron felin. Picture: Geograph.

Coed Fron Felin. Picture: Geograph.

This marked the end of Ceinws railway station which became a bus shelter.

During World War One, a line extending to the Coloreiddyn quarry was used to transport wood needed for the war effort.

However, the industry which had helped build the village fell on hard times and three of the quarries began to struggle and were gone by 1938 - leaving only the Aberllefenni quarry in business.

Many of the former quarry workers came to work in the forestry industry with the planting of the Dyfi Forest beginning in Ceinws in 1926.

The National Wales: The Old Forestry Buildings, Ceinws. Picture: Geograph.

The Old Forestry Buildings, Ceinws. Picture: Geograph.

One of the last slate quarries closed in 1952 when Llwyngwern closed and would stand empty for two decades until it became home to the Centre of Alternative Technology in 1974 and since become an internationally renowned site for renewable energy research.

The Corris Railway Society is now restoring the line through the village.

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