As Bonfire Night celebrations kick off today ahead of a weekend of firework displays, it could pay to be aware of little know laws that could lead to fines of up to £5,000.

Bonfire Night is an annual celebration where people celebrate Guy Fawkes' attempt to blow up Parliament with their own firework displays.

The law on firework displays

The National Wales: In England and Wales it is against the law to set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am. (Canva)In England and Wales it is against the law to set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am. (Canva)

However, there are certain rules you should be aware of, especially if you are planning a display from home which could risk “unlimited” fines and six months on prison.

In Wales it is against the law to set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am.

There are certain exceptions to this under the Fireworks Regulations 2004, notably Bonfire Night being midnight and Diwali with cut off point of 1am.

Causing unnecessary stress to animals

The National Wales: Anyone with pets will know how distressing Bonfire Night can be. (PA)Anyone with pets will know how distressing Bonfire Night can be. (PA)

Anyone who is the proud owner of pets will know that this can be a distressing time of year for their four-legged friends.

But did you know, causing unnecessary stress to animals, even through fireworks, is technically a crime?

It can lead to a hefty fine and even possible jail time.

People found to have caused "unnecessary suffering to an animal" falls under the Animal Welfare Act of 2006 and could see those guilty hit with an enormous and unlimited fine.

The RSPCA suggests that animals "trembling" in fear and "shaking, panting, and drooling" are clear signs of distress.

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