Llandudno's famous goats had to be rescued from the town's Great Orme after becoming stranded on unstable rocks near the sea.

The animals ended up stuck on the rocks after two female goats came into season and were pursued by 18 males into the area known locally as Austin's Rock. One kid (young) goat was also stranded there.

After being alerted to the incident by a member of the public, RSPCA officers and Conwy Council staff were dispatched to try and save the goats, amid concerns they would be swept away by high tides or starve due a lack of food supply.

"These goats were in real trouble - and had a rescue plan not been hatched, they would either have starved or drowned; as there was no grazing or palatable water and they were at risk from the tide at the next spring tide later this week," RSPCA inspector Mike Pugh said.

But they came up with a novel idea to free the goats from the outcrop, using 50 bales of hay to build a tiered path which the animals could then scale and return to the Orme.

The National Wales: A rescuer climbed down to build the tiered wall out of hay bales...A rescuer climbed down to build the tiered wall out of hay bales...

The National Wales: ...which the goats could then use to climb up to safety. Pictures: RSPCA...which the goats could then use to climb up to safety. Pictures: RSPCA

All 21 stranded goats have now walked back to safety using the hay bales.

Inspector Pugh praised the "innovative" rescue mission as "a really good example of what can be achieved together for animal welfare".

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The famous Great Orme goat population of around 200 animals has roamed wild in the local area for more than a century, and are thought to be descended from a pair of Indian goats presented by the Shah of Persia to Queen Victoria in 1837.

Last April, in the early weeks of the first lockdown, the herd hit headlines around the world when it ventured from the Great Orme into Llandudno, taking advantage of the town's deserted streets and helping themselves to the plants in residents' gardens.

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