Fear is mounting that a sewage pollution threat at a Welsh beauty spot is being underplayed by Dŵr Cymru, with the result that swimmers, visitors and beach users could be putting their own health at risk.

Natural Resources Wales data discovered by our sister title, Western Telegraph, confirms that water quality assessments at Wiseman’s Bridge in Pembrokeshire were carried out by the Bathing Water Directive a week ago (Thursday, August 18), when the water quality was found to be unacceptable.

However it was only Wednesday, (August 24), that a warning was issued by Pembrokeshire County Council in conjunction with Dŵr Cymru.

Fear is mounting that a sewage pollution threat at a Wiseman's Bridge in Pembrokeshire is being underplayed by Dŵr Cymru, with the result that swimmers, visitors and beach users could be putting their own health at risk.The warning notice that was placed at the beach yesterday afternoon

“The only information that people have been given is one single sign at the entrance to the beach informing them that there’s been a pollution,” commented a holiday accommodation proprietor, who is located near the site.

“But there’s nothing preventing them from going into the water and in my opinion, this is irresponsible.

"Adults and children are still going into the sea, despite nobody knowing the extent of the pollution problem, and naturally this could make them extremely ill.”

People are also concerned at the lack of information that is being made available concerning the full extent of the sewage pollution and the distance by which it may extend, with nearby bathing spots including Coppet Hall, Saundersfoot, Amroth Central and Tenby North all situated in close proximity.

“We’re advising all our customers against going into the sea but many just aren’t being made aware of the risks caused by the pollution and this is naturally a matter of great concern,” addeed the holiday operator.

The NWR states in its data that potential pollution sources at Wiseman’s Bridge were identified way back in 2012.

These included larger sewage discharges including a cess pitt, which at the time weren’t regulated by environmental permits.

Despite what the NRW describes as ‘considerable work’ which was undertaken to ensure that these sources were legalised, continued pollution risks continue in the upper catchment area as a result of land management issues in the agricultural sector.

“The storage and spreading of slurries on land that has been compacted through poor management or during poor soil or weather conditions are likely to be the highest risks here,” says the NRA envionment data.

Meanwhile an NRW spokesperson has confirmed that Dŵr Cymru had informed them of a permitted storm overflow located upstream near to Kilgetty and Stackpole, which may have affected the water quality downstream following Tuesday night’s heavy rain.

“We issue permits to allow sewers to overflow during heavy rain, particularly where there is a risk that the volume of water could overwhelm the wastewater network and impact homes and property,” he said.

“The issue is currently being resolved as keeping rivers and bathing waters clean and safe for people and wildlife is an important part of the work that we do."