PLAID Cymru has repeated its calls for the devolution of the Crown Estate to Wales after it announced plans for floating offshore wind farms in the Celtic Sea. 

The organisation - which manages land and property owned by the Royal Family - has identified five broad “areas of search” for developing the technology which could generate up to £43 billion for the UK economy. 

The Crown Estate, which hands over a per centage of its income to the Royal Family, is devolved to Scotland, meaning money it generates in Scotland is passed to the Scottish Government to support public services there. 

But the cash from its Welsh assets go direct to the UK treasury. 

Delyth Jewell MS, Plaid Cymru’s energy spokesperson, said Wales will miss out on the full potential economic benefits from the potential development off its coast, with the Crown also willing to offer licences for areas off the Cornish coast. 

The Crown Estate has said the plans could generate 4GW of electricity through floating winds farms, the tender for which will start in 2023. 

It says this will create 29,000 jobs although only 10,000 will be in Wales. 

Jewell said: “While there is a green goldrush off our shores, Wales will remain a mere spectator in the rush to capitalise from our natural resources. 

READ MORE:

“Plaid Cymru has long called for the economic levers and powers over the Crown Estate to be devolved to Wales, and now it’s crystal clear to see why this is so important. Instead of people of Wales being the ones who benefit from the leasing of our seabed, all the profits will disappear into UK Treasury, with a large chunk going to the Royal Family. 

“Put simply, the resources of Wales, should be governed by the Government of Wales, for the people of Wales. Devolving the Crown Estates’ Welsh territorial assets would allow us to align them with Welsh decision-making and priorities, and provide us with the means to use our resources to invest in our green future.” 

It’s estimated the Crown Estate’s plans could generate £43 billion for the UK economy by 2050. 

If you value The National's journalism, help grow our team of reporters by becoming a subscriber.