CANALS were once the routes which connected Britain but in Wales' capital city there has been little trace of this former industrial superhighway.

However, for weeks, construction workers have been busy turning the Canal Quarter masterplan in the eastern end of the city centre into reality by uncovering the docks feeder canal. 

The National Wales: The works underway on Churchill Way in Cardiff to unearth the canal that is hidden beneath the road. The works underway on Churchill Way in Cardiff to unearth the canal that is hidden beneath the road.

For decades, the canal had been covered by the road surface of Churchill Way - one of the widest roads in the city centre.

Construction crews have now removed the road surface and will be exposing the concrete slabs that cover the water underneath.

Engineers have already inspected the water beneath and have described it as "clear".

Parts of the feeder canal, such as that near the New Theatre and running alongside a busy road running between the main shopping district and the civic centre and National Museum, have remained exposed though often barely noticed by the thousands that pass it everyday.

The National Wales: A view of what was the road way on Churchill Way looking towards Queen Street.A view of what was the road way on Churchill Way looking towards Queen Street.

The year-long project to reopen the canal underneath Churchill Way began in February and as these pictures show the route of the canal has been left laying under a road for some 70 years.

Eventually the re-exposed canal will extend down to Tyndall Street.

The National Wales: The street, which contains a mixture of bars, shops, flats and offices, remains open for pedestrian access with the work to restore the canal taking place behind the hoardings.The street, which contains a mixture of bars, shops, flats and offices, remains open for pedestrian access with the work to restore the canal taking place behind the hoardings.

READ MORE: This is how a reopened dock feeder canal through the centre of Cardiff could look

Trees, shrubs and benches will be installed around the canal, as well as an ampitheatre-style outdoor stage. The council wants to make a “vibrant” area and reduce the risk of flooding, and has received funding from the Welsh Government and the City Deal.

If you value The National's journalism, help grow our team of reporters by becoming a subscriber.