A disused dual carriageway on the A48 near Imperial Park in Coedkernew is still strewn with illegal-dumped waste, despite being repeatedly flagged up to Newport City Council.

On Google Maps, it is possible to see the piles of tyres, furniture and white goods stacked up in what has been referred to as ‘the road to nowhere’.

Since a report in The National's sister publication The Argus in March, seemingly little has been done regarding the amount of rubbish left at the site.

CCTV cameras have been set up and the entrance is barred, but the piles of waste dumped at the site remain.

A number of people say they have approached Newport City Council and offered to help in cleaning up the site - but were rebuffed.

Local authorities can issue fixed penalty notices for fly-tipping and can fine people up to £50,000 for serious offences and imprison people for up to a year if convicted at a Magistrates' Court.

The worst offenders can be issued with an unlimited fine and be jailed for up to five years if convicted at a Crown Court.

It has been reported in the past that rubbish from Bristol, the Midlands and all around Wales has been found at the site.

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The road is owned by Newport City Council and was built in the 1990s when the LG factory was constructed.

The factory closed in the mid-2000s and the road was never used.

The Welsh Government own land nearby and has said previously that the land has been affected by the amount of fly-tipping on the disused road.

The Government is putting together a litter and fly-tipping prevention plan that will be published towards the end of the year.

A spokesman said: “We are aware Newport City Council has made progress in tackling fly-tipping at this site and has undertaken a number of successful enforcement actions against individuals.

“Fly-tipping cannot be justified under any circumstances and we remind everyone to ensure any waste is stored safely or disposed of legally.

“We continue to work closely with Council and other partner organisations to help develop long-term solutions to the problems on the site.”

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